Treatment of prediabetes

 

Treatment for prediabetes

  • If you have prediabetes, healthy lifestyle choices can help you bring your blood sugar level back to normal or at least keep it from rising toward the levels seen in type 2 diabetes. Your doctor will walk you through what you need to change, but typical recommendations are:

Eat well: The goal of the meal plan is to control your blood glucose level and keep it in the healthy, normal range. Your meal plan will be made just for you, taking into account your overall health, physical activity, and what you like to eat.
Exercise: When you exercise, your body uses more glucose, so exercising can lower your blood glucose level. Also when you exercise, your body doesn’t need as much insulin to transport the glucose; your body becomes less insulin resistant. Since your body isn’t using insulin well when you have prediabetes, a lower insulin resistance is a very good thing.
The American Diabetes Association recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate activity a week—that’s 30 minutes five days a week. You can get that through activities such as walking, bike riding, or swimming.

Lose weight: If you’re overweight, you should get started on a weight loss program as soon as you’re diagnosed with prediabetes. Losing just 5 to 10% of your weight can significantly reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Metformin: For people who are at a very high risk of developing type 2 diabetes after being diagnosed with prediabetes, the doctor may recommend a medication. The American Diabetes Association says that metformin should be the only medication used to prevent type 2. It works by keeping the liver from making more glucose when you don’t need it, thereby keeping your blood glucose level in a better range.

Treatment for gestational diabetes

Treating gestational diabetes comes down to one main thing: controlling your blood glucose level so that it doesn’t go too high. You can control your blood glucose level by eating well, exercising, and perhaps taking insulin or another medication. Not every woman with gestational diabetes has to take a medication or insulin. Your health care provider will also monitor your blood sugar level during labor. If your blood sugar rises, your baby may release high levels of insulin — which can lead to low blood sugar right after birth.